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Your Pet And Marijuana

The legalization of marijuana has made some sweeping changes in our beautiful state over the last few years. One thing that we’ve been seeing more of in the veterinary world is marijuana ingestion by pets. In this article from Armitage Animal Hospital, a Newmarket, ON vet discusses pot and pets.

Keep Products Out Of Paws’ Reach

One of the main tips for keeping your furry pal safe around marijuana is also one of the easiest. Keep marijuana products in a spot your pet can’t reach! This includes edibles and tinctures, as well as marijuana plants.

Don’t Give Pets Pot

Hopefully this goes without saying, but you should never give your pet marijuana products. Also, avoid exposing your little buddy to secondhand smoke.

Watch For Symptoms

There has been a massive increase in pet intoxication cases over the last few years. There are some common red flags to watch out for. These include glassy eyes, dilated pupils, whining, crying, tremors, a dazed look, lethargy, incontinence, agitation, fever/chills, trouble walking, and vomiting. In severe cases, pets may even go into coma. If you notice any of these warning signs, contact your vet immediately. While large amounts of marijuana are dangerous, in most ingestion cases, pets recover once the effects wear off. However, pets may need supportive care, such as being given fluids and having their heart rate monitored.

Be Honest

Many people are embarrassed or uncomfortable admitting that Fido or Fluffy got into their stash. If you know or suspect that your pet has ingested marijuana, don’t worry about speaking up. It’s much better to be honest! This will not only facilitate proper veterinary care, it will also prevent your vet from running unnecessary—and potentially expensive—tests. We’re not here to pass judgment: we just want to help your animal companion feel better!

CBD Treatments

You may have noticed that CBD pet products are now available. There have been few formal studies on these, though there are some promising signs. Our advice? Proceed with caution, and always check with your vet before using them on your pet.

Be Prepared

It never hurts to be prepared for the worst. Keep the Pet Poison hotline number on hand. That number is (855) 764-7661. (Note: charges may apply.)

Please contact Armitage Animal Hospital, your Newmarket, ON vet clinic, for all of your pet’s veterinary care needs. We’re here for you!

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